Life in Space

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  • 55 Depictions Of How People In The Past Envisioned Life Now
    “From family flying saucer rides to domestic living on the lunar surface, these gorgeous retrofuturism illustrations reveal how previous generations thought their future might look.“
  • Article: A Group of Tardigrades Crashed Into the Moon in April. The Indestructable Critters Could Still Be Alive
    "A horde of microscopic critters called tardigrades were passengers aboard the Israeli spacecraft Beresheet, which crashed into the lunar surface nearly four months ago. But because tardigrates can survive in extreme environments, it's likely these tiny astronauts are still alive. The microscopic organisms can go without water and oxygen for long periods of time in a state of suspended animation called cryptobiosis, in which their bodies dry up and their metabolisms shut down."
  • Article: Anyone Out There? METI Scientists Message Alien World
    Earth is sending a calling card to the cosmos—a series of radio signals to start an interstellar conversation with an alien civilization.
  • Article: Could Future Homes on the Moon and Mars Be Made of Fungi?
    "Science fiction often imagines our future on Mars and other planets as run by machines, with metallic cities and flying cars rising above dunes of red sand. But the reality may be even stranger – and "greener." Instead of habitats made of metal and glass, NASA is exploring technologies that could grow structures out of fungi to become our future homes in the stars, and perhaps lead to more sustainable ways of living on Earth as well."
  • Article: Our Living Planet Shapes the Search for Life Beyond Earth
    "Life. It's the one thing that, so far, makes Earth unique among the thousands of other planets we've discovered. Since the fall of 1997, NASA satellites have continuously and globally observed all plant life at the surface of the land and ocean. During the week of Nov. 13-17, NASA is sharing stories and videos about how this view of life from space is furthering knowledge of our home planet and the search for life on other worlds."
  • Article: The Uniquely Human Messages We Send to Aliens
    The Golden record is one of the most famous examples of messeges we have sent into space. Find out more in this Medium article.
  • Article: Top 5 Messages to Alien Civilizations
    "Ever since we've had the capability, humanity has been desperately trying to make contact with other life in the universe. While we've been beaming out information passively through our television and radio broadcasts, we've also sent more intentional messages. Looking at these messages tells us how humanity wants to think of itself and what kind of relationship we hope to have with alien life."
  • Gravitational Waves Hit The Late Show
    Brian Greene stops by to demonstrate an exciting new scientific discovery
  • Nasa Art shaped visions of our future
    “In 1975, scientists at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California, dreamt up ideas for habitats that could house human civilization in space. Rick Guidice was a freelance illustrator with a background in architecture when NASA tasked him with creating the artistic renderings. The Mountain View team conceptualized three designs over the course of a 10-week study: the Toroidal Colony, the Bernal Sphere, and the Cylindrical Colony—each one a massive structure with sloping interiors and glistening exteriors. “
  • Resource: DNA Building Blocks Can Be Made In Space
    "NASA-funded researchers have evidence that some building blocks of DNA, the molecule that carries the genetic instructions for life, found in meteorites were likely created in space. The research gives support to the theory that a "kit" of ready-made parts created in space and delivered to Earth by meteorite and comet impacts assisted the origin of life."
  • Resource: Star Stories
    "Our Universes, an inaugural exhibition of the National Museum of the American Indian, focuses on indigenous cosmologies—worldviews and philosophies related to the creation and order of the universe—and the spiritual relationship between humankind and the natural world. Organized around the solar year, the exhibition introduces visitors to indigenous peoples from across the Western Hemisphere who continue to express the wisdom of their ancestors in celebration, language, art, spirituality, and daily life. Included in the exhibition are these 9 animated traditional stories that give special meaning to the stars above."- Smithsonian NMAI
  • Video: Astrobiology-Life in the Universe
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  • Video: Astrobiology: The Search for Life Beyond Earth | Marta Filipa Cortesão | TEDxUniversityOfPorto
    What other environments are there in our solar system and beyond? Could they support life? What would that life look like? In this talk Marta tells us more about the science of Astrobiology and what we can expect in the next space missions to Mars or Jupiter´s moon Europa.
  • Video: Children of Planet Earth: The Voyager Golden Record Remixed - Symphony of Science
    Song by Symphony of Science "tribute to one of the coolest objects mankind has ever produced - the Voyager Golden Record. Knowing that a billion years from now these two messengers will still be out there is mind-bendingly awesome. I can't imagine a better representation of humanity."
  • Video: Dakota Star Knowledge-"We Come From the Stars"
    "An animation I created for We Are Water MN. It is narrated by Jim Rock, UMD Alworth Planetarium Program Director and Dakota Astronomer as he shares his traditional knowledge of the connections with sky and earth. He also speaks of the burial mounds and sacred Wakan Tipi cave in Saint Paul, Minnesota, which speak to our celestial origins."- Marlena Myles
  • Video: Earth Climate Models Bring Exoplanets to Life
    "In a generic brick building on the northwestern edge of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center campus in Greenbelt, Maryland, thousands of computers packed in racks the size of vending machines hum in a deafening chorus of data crunching. Day and night, they spit out five quadrillion calculations per second. Known collectively as the Discover supercomputer, these machines are tasked with running sophisticated climate models to predict Earth’s future climate. But now, they’re also sussing out something much farther away: whether any of the more than 4,000 curiously weird planets beyond our solar system — or exoplanets — discovered in the past two decades could have the ingredients necessary to support life."
  • Video: Exploding Universe
    "Out of devastating events in the cosmos comes new creation. Explosive phenomena are responsible for the way we see the universe today, and not all of them happen on a grand scale.
  • Video: Meet the Tarigrade The Toughest Animal on Earth
    "Without water, a human can only survive for about 100 hours. But there’s a creature so resilient that it can go without it for decades. This 1-millimeter animal can survive both the hottest and coldest environments on earth, and can even withstand high levels of radiation. Thomas Boothby introduces us to the tardigrade, one of the toughest creatures on Earth."- TED-Ed
  • Video: Navajo Story of Stars
    Navajo leaders and NASA scientists share perspectives on the stars.
  • Video: Powers of Ten (1977)
    "Powers of Ten takes us on an adventure in magnitudes. Starting at a picnic by the lakeside in Chicago, this famous film transports us to the outer edges of the universe. Every ten seconds we view the starting point from ten times farther out until our own galaxy is visible only as a speck of light among many others. Returning to Earth with breathtaking speed, we move inward- into the hand of the sleeping picnicker- with ten times more magnification every ten seconds. Our journey ends inside a proton of a carbon atom within a DNA molecule in a white blood cell. POWERS OF TEN © 1977 EAMES OFFICE LLC (Available at www.eamesoffice.com)"
  • Video: Should We Be Looking For Life Elsewhere in the Universe?
    "As the number of “potentially habitable” planets that astronomers find continues to rise, we seem ever closer to answering the question, “Are we alone in the universe?” But should we be looking for life elsewhere? If we were to find life in one of these worlds, should we try to contact any beings who may live there? Is that wise? Aomawa Shields navigates the murky waters of pursuing curiosity. " TED- Ed includes Lessons
  • Video: Tardigrades Are the Toughest Animal on Earth That Can Survive Space and Volcanos
    "Tardigrades, also known as water bears or moss piglets, are the toughest and probably the weirdest animal species on Earth. Tardigrades are eight-legged micro-animals that can withstand just about anything, from mass extinctions to the vacuum of outer space, to the pressure of the Mariana Trench, the deepest point on Earth, and radiation 1,000 times stronger than humans can handle"
  • Video: We Are Star Dust- Symphony of Science
    We Are Star Dust is a musical compliation of scientists Neil DeGrasse Tyson, Richard Feynman and Lawrence Krauss.
  • Video: We're Made of Stardust. Here's How.
    "13.8 billion years ago, the universe began with a big bang and the atoms it created would find their way into everything: from celestial stars to the human body. From the Show: Finding Life in Outer Space"
  • White Paper: Ethical Exploration and the Role of Planetary Protection in Disrupting Colonial Practices
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