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  • SPACE MESSENGERS VIDEO RESOURCE: Vimeo Channel
    Video production and animation by OMAi Space Messengers is a ‘mixed reality’ installation that explores the impact of science and technologies on our societies, our planet and our universe. In a choreographed site specific large-scale projection, ‘space’ messages and voices of the youth are displayed along with their body silhouettes on to buildings. Animated earth/space imagery is live mixed in real time inside the silhouettes expressing the ‘universe within’. In partnership with the U.S Embassy of Portugal and the U.S. Consulate General of Guadalajara. This virtual collaboration connects middle/high school classrooms in New Mexico, USA with classrooms in Lisbon, Portugal and Guadalajara, Mexico (more countries to be added) through a shared sci-art installation that will tour around the world. The Space Messengers project features a series of interdisciplinary speakers that share their knowledge with students in these recorded presentations.
  • A Tour of Data Sonification: Sounds from Around the Milky Way
    “The center of our Milky Way galaxy is too distant for us to visit in person, but we can still explore it. Telescopes gives us a chance to see what the Galactic Center looks like in different types of light. By translating the inherently digital data captured by telescopes in space into images, astronomers create visual representations that would otherwise be invisible to us. But what about experiencing these images with other senses like hearing? Sonification is the process that translates data into sound, and a new project brings the center of the Milky Way to listeners for the first time. As the bar moves from left to right across the image, the sounds represent the position and brightness of the sources detected by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, Hubble Space Telescope, and Spitzer Space Telescope. The light of objects located towards the top of the image are heard as higher pitches while the intensity of the light controls the volume. Each type of light reveals different phenomena in this region, which is roughly 400 light years across at a distance of about 26,000 light years from Earth. The supermassive black hole at the center of the Galaxy, called Sagittarius A*, resides in the bright region to the lower right of the image.” - Chandra X-ray Observatory
  • Article: Why we explore space
    Human space exploration helps to address fundamental questions about our place in the Universe and the history of our solar system. Through addressing the challenges related to human space exploration we expand technology, create new industries, and help to foster a peaceful connection with other nations.
  • Article: 4,000 Comet Discovered by ESA & NASA Solar Observatory
    "On June 15, 2020, a citizen scientist spotted a never-before-seen comet in data from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, or SOHO — the 4,000th comet discovery in the spacecraft’s 25-year history."
  • Article: Could Future Homes on the Moon and Mars Be Made of Fungi?
    "Science fiction often imagines our future on Mars and other planets as run by machines, with metallic cities and flying cars rising above dunes of red sand. But the reality may be even stranger – and "greener." Instead of habitats made of metal and glass, NASA is exploring technologies that could grow structures out of fungi to become our future homes in the stars, and perhaps lead to more sustainable ways of living on Earth as well."
  • Article: NASA Fosters Innovative Ways to Understand Biodiversity
    "To study and monitor changes in Earth’s biodiversity, or the immense volume of organisms in the world, scientists and citizen scientists record their sightings in the field. At the same time, sensors on the ground and on board satellites and aircraft monitor flora and fauna on a regional to global scale. NASA has funded four projects to create new, virtual portals that bring into focus this wealth of biodiversity information to help inform scientists, land managers and decision makers around the world regarding the status and health of terrestrial ecosystems. Each of these projects highlights a different aspect of biodiversity and lets users create easy-to-use maps and other information products to track healthy and vulnerable species as they compete for resources, migrate to safer habitats and adapt to climate change."
  • Article: Our Living Planet Shapes the Search for Life Beyond Earth
    "Life. It's the one thing that, so far, makes Earth unique among the thousands of other planets we've discovered. Since the fall of 1997, NASA satellites have continuously and globally observed all plant life at the surface of the land and ocean. During the week of Nov. 13-17, NASA is sharing stories and videos about how this view of life from space is furthering knowledge of our home planet and the search for life on other worlds."
  • Article: The Uniquely Human Messages We Send to Aliens
    The Golden record is one of the most famous examples of messeges we have sent into space. Find out more in this Medium article.
  • Article: What is Remote Sensing?
    "Remote sensing is the acquiring of information from a distance. NASA observes the Earth and other planetary bodies via remote sensors on satellites and aircraft that detect and record reflected or emitted energy. Remote sensors, which provide a global perspective and a wealth of data about Earth systems, enable data-informed decision making based on the current and future state of our planet."
  • Citizen Science Game: NASA's Nemo-Net
    “NeMO-Net is a single player iPad game where players help NASA classify coral reefs by painting 3D and 2D images of coral...Data from the NeMO-Net game is fed to NASA NeMO-Net, the first neural multi-modal observation and training network for global coral reef assessment. NeMO-Net is an open source deep convolutional neural network (CNN) that leverages NASA’s Supercomputer, Pleiades, to use game data to classify and assess the health of coral reefs around the world. “
  • Citizen Science: Backyard Worlds-Planet 9
    "We need your help searching for new objects at the edges of our solar system. In this project, we'll ask you to help us distinguish real celestial objects from image artifacts in data from NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mission. The real objects are brown dwarfs and low-mass stars, the Sun's nearest neighbors. You may find an object closer than Proxima Centauri (the closest star to the Sun) or even discover the Sun's hypothesized ninth planet, which models suggest might appear in these images."
  • Nasa Art shaped visions of our future
    “In 1975, scientists at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California, dreamt up ideas for habitats that could house human civilization in space. Rick Guidice was a freelance illustrator with a background in architecture when NASA tasked him with creating the artistic renderings. The Mountain View team conceptualized three designs over the course of a 10-week study: the Toroidal Colony, the Bernal Sphere, and the Cylindrical Colony—each one a massive structure with sloping interiors and glistening exteriors. “
  • NASA Listens in as Electrons Whistle While They Work
    "Space is not empty, nor is it silent. While technically a vacuum, space nonetheless contains energetic charged particles, governed by magnetic and electric fields, and it behaves unlike anything we experience on Earth. In regions laced with magnetic fields, such as the space environment surrounding our planet, particles are continually tossed to and fro by the motion of various electromagnetic waves known as plasma waves. These plasma waves, like the roaring ocean surf, create a rhythmic cacophony that — with the right tools — we can hear across space."
  • NASA's SoundCloud
    "Explore the universe and discover our home planet with NASA through a collection of our sounds from historic spaceflights and current missions. You can hear the roar of a space shuttle launch or Neil Armstrong's "One small step for (a) man, one giant leap for mankind" every time you get a phone call if you make our sounds your ringtone. Or, you can hear the memorable words "Houston, we've had a problem," every time you make an error on your computer.
  • Resource: Astronomer's Toolbox
    How do we know what we know? Check out this NASA resourse to help explore the questions of our universe including topics of light, the electromagnetic spectrum, and other messengers from space like gravitational waves and cosmic rays.
  • Resource: DNA Building Blocks Can Be Made In Space
    "NASA-funded researchers have evidence that some building blocks of DNA, the molecule that carries the genetic instructions for life, found in meteorites were likely created in space. The research gives support to the theory that a "kit" of ready-made parts created in space and delivered to Earth by meteorite and comet impacts assisted the origin of life."
  • Resource: NASA Visualization Studio
    "Explore the latest visualizations of NASA's Earth Observing satellites and the data they collect. NASA researchers are constantly tracking remote-sensing data and modeling processes to better understand our home planet."
  • The Sound of Space (Use Your Headphones)
    “In space, electromagnetic vibrations exist and can be mapped as sound. These electromagnetic vibrations pulsate in different wavelengths and can be recorded by sepcial equipment in NASA's spacecrafts. The recordings are then translated into sounds that our ears could hear.”
  • Video: Earth Climate Models Bring Exoplanets to Life
    "In a generic brick building on the northwestern edge of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center campus in Greenbelt, Maryland, thousands of computers packed in racks the size of vending machines hum in a deafening chorus of data crunching. Day and night, they spit out five quadrillion calculations per second. Known collectively as the Discover supercomputer, these machines are tasked with running sophisticated climate models to predict Earth’s future climate. But now, they’re also sussing out something much farther away: whether any of the more than 4,000 curiously weird planets beyond our solar system — or exoplanets — discovered in the past two decades could have the ingredients necessary to support life."
  • Video: What Does Your Sky Look Like? Globe Observer- Clouds
    Clouds are a major component of the Earth's system that reflect, absorb, and scatter sunlight and infrared emissions from Earth. This affects how energy passes through the atmosphere. Different types of clouds have different effects, and the amount of cloud cover is also important. Clouds can change rapidly, so frequent observations are useful to track these changes. Such observations are able to see change over time and help with interpretation of satellite cloud data. The cloud observation tool in the GLOBE Observer app allows you to photograph clouds and record sky observations and compare them with NASA satellite images. Our goal is to provide a step-by-step process that helps you learn about clouds and their classification through simple observations and photography. You are an important part of the puzzle, providing a new perspective of the clouds that our NASA satellites do not have, looking up. We are excited for you to start collecting data through this updated cloud protocol featuring NASA satellite comparison! Learn the basics of how to observe clouds with the GLOBE Observer App. Observations can be made anywhere and anytime. Open the app, select Clouds and follow the directions! Help scientists as a citizen scientist with your observations.
  • White Paper: Ethical Exploration and the Role of Planetary Protection in Disrupting Colonial Practices
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