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  • 55 Depictions Of How People In The Past Envisioned Life Now
    “From family flying saucer rides to domestic living on the lunar surface, these gorgeous retrofuturism illustrations reveal how previous generations thought their future might look.“
  • SPACE MESSENGERS VIDEO RESOURCE: Vimeo Channel
    Video production and animation by OMAi Space Messengers is a ‘mixed reality’ installation that explores the impact of science and technologies on our societies, our planet and our universe. In a choreographed site specific large-scale projection, ‘space’ messages and voices of the youth are displayed along with their body silhouettes on to buildings. Animated earth/space imagery is live mixed in real time inside the silhouettes expressing the ‘universe within’. In partnership with the U.S Embassy of Portugal and the U.S. Consulate General of Guadalajara. This virtual collaboration connects middle/high school classrooms in New Mexico, USA with classrooms in Lisbon, Portugal and Guadalajara, Mexico (more countries to be added) through a shared sci-art installation that will tour around the world. The Space Messengers project features a series of interdisciplinary speakers that share their knowledge with students in these recorded presentations.
  • 17 Sustainable Development Goals
    The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, adopted by all United Nations Member States in 2015, provides a shared blueprint for peace and prosperity for people and the planet, now and into the future. At its heart are the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), which are an urgent call for action by all countries - developed and developing - in a global partnership. They recognize that ending poverty and other deprivations must go hand-in-hand with strategies that improve health and education, reduce inequality, and spur economic growth – all while tackling climate change and working to preserve our oceans and forests.
  • A Tool for exploring plausible, probable, possible and preferred futures
    "The future has the potential to unfold in many ways and exploring those possibilities can be overwhelming. The cone of plausibility is one tool that can help guide those explorations. It was first created in 1988 to help explore geopolitical scenarios, but what makes this tool especially useful is that it can be used to explore a variety of topics, including the future of learning. " J Swanson
  • A Tour of Data Sonification: Sounds from Around the Milky Way
    “The center of our Milky Way galaxy is too distant for us to visit in person, but we can still explore it. Telescopes gives us a chance to see what the Galactic Center looks like in different types of light. By translating the inherently digital data captured by telescopes in space into images, astronomers create visual representations that would otherwise be invisible to us. But what about experiencing these images with other senses like hearing? Sonification is the process that translates data into sound, and a new project brings the center of the Milky Way to listeners for the first time. As the bar moves from left to right across the image, the sounds represent the position and brightness of the sources detected by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, Hubble Space Telescope, and Spitzer Space Telescope. The light of objects located towards the top of the image are heard as higher pitches while the intensity of the light controls the volume. Each type of light reveals different phenomena in this region, which is roughly 400 light years across at a distance of about 26,000 light years from Earth. The supermassive black hole at the center of the Galaxy, called Sagittarius A*, resides in the bright region to the lower right of the image.” - Chandra X-ray Observatory
  • Afrofuturism
    “Afrofuturism addresses themes and concerns of the African diaspora through technoculture and speculative fiction, encompassing a range of media and artists with a shared interest in envisioning black futures that stem from Afro-diasporic experiences.”
  • Dr. Greg Cajete on native science and biodiversity loss
    BioSTEAM: Dr. Greg Cajete talks about native science and biodiversity loss
  • Ethnoscience
    “Ethnoscience has been defined as an attempt "to reconstitute what serves as science for others, their practices of looking after themselves and their bodies, their botanical knowledge, but also their forms of classification, of making connections, etc." (Augé, 1999: 118). “
  • How can science fiction predict the future?
    "Would you like to know what’s in our future? What’s going to happen to humanity tomorrow, next year, or even a millennium from now? Well, you’re not alone. Everyone from governments to military to industry leaders do as well, and they all employ people - called ‘futurists’ - who attempt to forecast the future. Roey Tzezana explains some of the ways that futurists venture to do so." TedED
  • How Feynman Diagrams Revolutionized Physics
    “In the late 1940s, Richard Feynman invented a visual tool for simplifying particle calculations that forever changed theoretical physics.”
  • Imagining the future is just another form of memory
    “Imagining the future is a kind of nostalgia, because humans predict what the future will be like by using their memories. This is how things you do over and over again become routine. For example, you know generally what your day will be like at the office tomorrow based on what your day at the office was like today, and all the other days you’ve spent there. But memory also helps people predict what it will be like to do things they haven’t done before.” J. Beck
  • Indigenous Knowledge and Western Science: Dr. Leroy Little Bear Talk
    Indigenous academic Leroy Little Bear compares the foundational base of Blackfoot knowledge to quantum physics to an attentive audience at The Banff Centre as part of the Indigenous Knowledge and Western Science: Contrasts and Similarities event. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gJSJ28eEUjI
  • Is there Sound in Space?
    “Sound can’t actually travel through a vacuum like space, but scientists have learned that there’s still plenty to hear.”- SciShow
  • Nasa Art shaped visions of our future
    “In 1975, scientists at NASA’s Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California, dreamt up ideas for habitats that could house human civilization in space. Rick Guidice was a freelance illustrator with a background in architecture when NASA tasked him with creating the artistic renderings. The Mountain View team conceptualized three designs over the course of a 10-week study: the Toroidal Colony, the Bernal Sphere, and the Cylindrical Colony—each one a massive structure with sloping interiors and glistening exteriors. “
  • Picturing particles
    “Particle physicists study a field that is, by its very nature, invisible to the naked eye,” says Riccardo-Maria Bianchi, who works on ATLAS visualisation software. “That can make the task of visualising particle interactions very challenging.”
  • Radio and Plasma Wave Science, or RPWS, instrument
    “They surveyed and sniffed, analyzed and scrutinized. They took stunning images in various visible spectra. Cassini's 12 science instruments were designed to carry out sophisticated scientific studies of Saturn, from collecting data in multiple regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, to studying dust particles, to characterizing Saturn's plasma environment and magnetosphere.”
  • Rick Hill: What is Indigenous knowledge?
    “Rick Hill (Tuscarora) is an artist, writer and curator who lives at the Six Nations Community of the Grand River Territory in Ontario, Canada. Over the years, Rick has served as the Manager of the Indian Art Centre, Ottawa, Ontario; Director of the Indian Museum at the Institute of American Arts in Santa Fe, NM; and the Assistant Director for Public Programs at the National Museum of the American Indian, Smithsonian Institution; and Manager of the Haudenosaunee Resource Center. Currently he is the Coordinator for the Joint Stewardship Board at Six Nations to develop an environmental interpretation centre and is the manager of the Six Nations Virtual Archives Project.”
  • Sound Properties: Amplitude, period, frequency, wavelength
    How to find the amplitude, period, frequency, and wavelength for a sound wave. Created by David SantoPietro.
  • TEACHER TOOL: Futures Literacy
    "The term Futures Literacy mimics the idea of reading and writing literacy because it is a skill that everyone can and should acquire. And it is a skill that is within everyone’s reach. People can become more skilled at ‘using-the-future’, more ‘futures literate’, because of two facts. One is that the future does not yet exist, it can only be imagined. Two is that humans have the ability to imagine. As a result, humans are able to learn to imagine the future for different reasons and in different ways. Thereby becoming more ‘futures literate’."
  • The Sound of Space (Use Your Headphones)
    “In space, electromagnetic vibrations exist and can be mapped as sound. These electromagnetic vibrations pulsate in different wavelengths and can be recorded by sepcial equipment in NASA's spacecrafts. The recordings are then translated into sounds that our ears could hear.”
  • The Standard Model
    The theories and discoveries of thousands of physicists since the 1930s have resulted in a remarkable insight into the fundamental structure of matter: everything in the universe is found to be made from a few basic building blocks called fundamental particles, governed by four fundamental forces. Our best understanding of how these particles and three of the forces are related to each other is encapsulated in the Standard Model of particle physics. Developed in the early 1970s, it has successfully explained almost all experimental results and precisely predicted a wide variety of phenomena. Over time and through many experiments, the Standard Model has become established as a well-tested physics theory.
  • This Blind Astrophysicist 'Sees' the Universe in the Most Amazing Way
    "Wanda Diaz-Merced studies the universe through sound. After losing her eyesight in early adulthood, she found a way to continue her work as an astrophysicist by converting scientific data into sound."
  • Waves, Light and Sound - Physics 101 / AP Physics 1 Review with Physics Girl
    “Lesson 17 (Waves, Light, and Sound) of Dianna's Intro Physics Class on Physics Girl. Never taken physics before? Want to learn the basics of physics? Need a review of AP Physics concepts before the exam? This course is for you! “
  • What is CERN?
    A tour of CERN and its research facilities.
  • What is Imaging Science?
    An overview to the field of imaging science
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