Waves

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  • A Tour of Data Sonification: Sounds from Around the Milky Way
    “The center of our Milky Way galaxy is too distant for us to visit in person, but we can still explore it. Telescopes gives us a chance to see what the Galactic Center looks like in different types of light. By translating the inherently digital data captured by telescopes in space into images, astronomers create visual representations that would otherwise be invisible to us. But what about experiencing these images with other senses like hearing? Sonification is the process that translates data into sound, and a new project brings the center of the Milky Way to listeners for the first time. As the bar moves from left to right across the image, the sounds represent the position and brightness of the sources detected by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory, Hubble Space Telescope, and Spitzer Space Telescope. The light of objects located towards the top of the image are heard as higher pitches while the intensity of the light controls the volume. Each type of light reveals different phenomena in this region, which is roughly 400 light years across at a distance of about 26,000 light years from Earth. The supermassive black hole at the center of the Galaxy, called Sagittarius A*, resides in the bright region to the lower right of the image.” - Chandra X-ray Observatory
  • Article: Anyone Out There? METI Scientists Message Alien World
    Earth is sending a calling card to the cosmos—a series of radio signals to start an interstellar conversation with an alien civilization.
  • Article: Top 5 Messages to Alien Civilizations
    "Ever since we've had the capability, humanity has been desperately trying to make contact with other life in the universe. While we've been beaming out information passively through our television and radio broadcasts, we've also sent more intentional messages. Looking at these messages tells us how humanity wants to think of itself and what kind of relationship we hope to have with alien life."
  • Citizen Science: Backyard Worlds-Planet 9
    "We need your help searching for new objects at the edges of our solar system. In this project, we'll ask you to help us distinguish real celestial objects from image artifacts in data from NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) mission. The real objects are brown dwarfs and low-mass stars, the Sun's nearest neighbors. You may find an object closer than Proxima Centauri (the closest star to the Sun) or even discover the Sun's hypothesized ninth planet, which models suggest might appear in these images."
  • Crab Nebula Sonification
    "The Crab Nebula has been studied by people since it first appeared in Earth's sky in 1054 A.D. Modern telescopes have captured its enduring engine powered by a quickly spinning neutron star that formed when a massive star collapsed. The combination of rapid rotation and a strong magnetic field generates jets of matter and anti-matter flowing away from its poles, and winds outward from its equator. For the translation of these data into sound, which also pans left to right, each wavelength of light has been paired with a different family of instruments. X-rays from Chandra X-ray Observatory (blue and white) are brass, optical light data from Hubble Space Telescope (purple) are strings, and infrared data from Spitzer (pink) can be heard in the woodwinds. In each case, light received towards the top of the image is played as higher pitched notes and brighter light is played louder. (NASA/CXC/SAO/K.Arcand, SYSTEM Sounds (M. Russo, A. Santaguida)"
  • Data Visualization: Masses in the Stellar Graveyard
    What are the densest objects that form when stars die?
  • Gravitational Waves Hit The Late Show
    Brian Greene stops by to demonstrate an exciting new scientific discovery
  • Gravity Waves Ripple over Marine Stratocumulus Clouds
    "In this natural-color image from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), a fingerprint-like gravity wave feature occurs over a deck of marine stratocumulus clouds. Similar to the ripples that occur when a pebble is thrown into a still pond, such "gravity waves" sometimes appear when the relatively stable and stratified air masses associated with stratocumulus cloud layers are disturbed by a vertical trigger from the underlying terrain, or by a thunderstorm updraft or some other vertical wind shear. The"
  • Is there Sound in Space?
    “Sound can’t actually travel through a vacuum like space, but scientists have learned that there’s still plenty to hear.”- SciShow
  • NASA Listens in as Electrons Whistle While They Work
    "Space is not empty, nor is it silent. While technically a vacuum, space nonetheless contains energetic charged particles, governed by magnetic and electric fields, and it behaves unlike anything we experience on Earth. In regions laced with magnetic fields, such as the space environment surrounding our planet, particles are continually tossed to and fro by the motion of various electromagnetic waves known as plasma waves. These plasma waves, like the roaring ocean surf, create a rhythmic cacophony that — with the right tools — we can hear across space."
  • NASA's SoundCloud
    "Explore the universe and discover our home planet with NASA through a collection of our sounds from historic spaceflights and current missions. You can hear the roar of a space shuttle launch or Neil Armstrong's "One small step for (a) man, one giant leap for mankind" every time you get a phone call if you make our sounds your ringtone. Or, you can hear the memorable words "Houston, we've had a problem," every time you make an error on your computer.
  • Radio and Plasma Wave Science, or RPWS, instrument
    “They surveyed and sniffed, analyzed and scrutinized. They took stunning images in various visible spectra. Cassini's 12 science instruments were designed to carry out sophisticated scientific studies of Saturn, from collecting data in multiple regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, to studying dust particles, to characterizing Saturn's plasma environment and magnetosphere.”
  • Resource: Astronomer's Toolbox
    How do we know what we know? Check out this NASA resourse to help explore the questions of our universe including topics of light, the electromagnetic spectrum, and other messengers from space like gravitational waves and cosmic rays.
  • Resource: Space Audio
    "These are the "sounds of space" collected by UIowa instruments on various spacecraft."
  • Sound Properties: Amplitude, period, frequency, wavelength
    How to find the amplitude, period, frequency, and wavelength for a sound wave. Created by David SantoPietro.
  • Tech Tool: OpenFrameWorks
    OpenFrameworks is an open source C++ toolkit for Creative Coding. and is featired in the Space Messenger Space Board- an interactive platform for communication, art installation and messaging across boarders and space.
  • The Sound of Space (Use Your Headphones)
    “In space, electromagnetic vibrations exist and can be mapped as sound. These electromagnetic vibrations pulsate in different wavelengths and can be recorded by sepcial equipment in NASA's spacecrafts. The recordings are then translated into sounds that our ears could hear.”
  • Video: Exploding Universe
    "Out of devastating events in the cosmos comes new creation. Explosive phenomena are responsible for the way we see the universe today, and not all of them happen on a grand scale.
  • Video: Gravitational Waves Explained
    "This video is about gravitational waves in the weak field limit as discovered by the LIGO collaboration, explained by parallels to electromagnetic radiation, sound waves, water waves, etc."
  • Video: I Visited the First Gravitational Wave Detector! LIGO
    "We’ve been waiting to verify the existence of Gravitational Waves for over 100 years and I actually got to go to LIGO to see exactly how they proved it! "- Physics Girl
  • Video: Nuetron Star Collision Observed for First Time
    "On August 17, researchers around the world detected the signals from a neutron star collision that took place 130 million years ago. Georgia Tech Professor Laura Cadonati explains what happened, how it was seen, and what researchers have learned."
  • Video: The Basics of the Higgs Boson
    "In 2012, scientists at CERN discovered evidence of the Higgs boson. The what? The Higgs boson is one of two types of fundamental particles and is a particular game-changer in the field of particle physics, proving how particles gain mass. Using the Socratic method, CERN scientists Dave Barney and Steve Goldfarb explain the exciting implications of the Higgs boson."
  • Video: What Are Gravitational Waves?
    "In September 2015, scientists witnessed something never seen before: two black holes colliding. Both about 30 times as big as our Sun, they had been orbiting each other for millions of years. A fraction of a second before the crash, they sent a vibration across the universe at the speed of light that was picked up by the LIGO detector. So what are these ripples in space? Amber L. Stuver explains. " TED-Ed includes lessons
  • Video: What's The Smallest Thing In The Universe?
    "If you were to take a coffee cup, and break it in half, then in half again, and keep carrying on, where would you end up? Could you keep on going forever? Or would you eventually find a set of indivisible building blocks out of which everything is made? Jonathan Butterworth explains the Standard Model theory and how it helps us understand the world we live in. Lesson by Jon Butterworth, directed by Nick Hilditch." TED-Ed includes Lessons
  • Waves, Light and Sound - Physics 101 / AP Physics 1 Review with Physics Girl
    “Lesson 17 (Waves, Light, and Sound) of Dianna's Intro Physics Class on Physics Girl. Never taken physics before? Want to learn the basics of physics? Need a review of AP Physics concepts before the exam? This course is for you! “
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